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growing up corporate

A good reflection on some of the unique challenges in going corporate for some of us.  

aromatic:

It’s more subtle than that. The first thing you have to do as an Asian girl is dispel everyone’s preconceptions about you. Slyly reassure those around you that you’re not quiet, shy, unassertive, ditzy, passive-aggressive, easily influenced, sweet, apolitical, innocent, and/or bland. Never mind that some of those things directly contradict each other. Then you have to deal with everyone’s shock that you’re so “different,” so “unexpected,” so “sassy.” Never mind that this is what racism is now. Never mind that you can never directly mention it, because it’s not like anyone holds any ill will against you. But why do I just have to sit here and take it? There aren’t really any answers. The only thing you can really do is turn this bullshit ‘shock factor’ into a way to wield some degree of power. But… how? Whose responsibility is it to figure this out, anyway? Why do I have to worry about five things at once? Answer: life is unfair.

But not as unfair as it could be. How lucky am I to be in this position? Well-educated, aware of what’s going on around me, more-or-less gainfully employed. For the first time, the path isn’t drawn for me. Not just because I don’t know what’s to come down the line, professionally. But because every action I take from now on is instilled with a sense of (likely overblown, but hey) personal responsibility. Maybe I have the ability to change some things. Small things. Still. Small things can ripple. It’s time to start collecting these experiences and think, REALLY think, about them critically. And mold them into something concrete, something with the wisdom of experience, something that produces a positive impact. Even if no one recognizes it. Especially if no one can recognize it. Because it is only when we don’t have to point out how much better things have become that we reach true progress. 

Been enjoying the Gana en Grande McDonald’s commercials I’ve been seeing stateside. It’s an interesting play on multiple fan allegiances and dualities in identities in America.

Also, is it totally terrible this reminded me of Peggy Olson’s Burger Chef pitch on Mad Men? Obviously not as pessimistic or dramatic of a backdrop, but definitely playing on the fast food restaurant as a neutral ground that brings families together theme, also playing on social connection.

I’ve been ragging on Adidas ad campaign most of this World Cup, but this full-length version is redeeming.  It’s just a shame the other iterations of this commercial show discordant bits of and pieces of this story rather than taking advantage of the full narrative (accompanied with a great Kanye track).  

This is in contrast to Nike’s rollout of three distinct ads for its #riskeverything campaign with the tense teaser featuring Neymar, Rooney, and Ronaldo; whimsical childhood fantasy Winner Stays and giving Pixar a run for its money with the animated The Last Game.

Slicing this same commercial again and again made the storytelling weak compared with Nike’s three distinct narratives to fit the #riskeverything.  I saw at least two one-minute versions of the Adidas that couldn’t stand on its own.  

It’s interesting given that both Adidas and Nike have additional commercial content, such as the star power in Adida’s other version featuring the likes of David Beckham Zinedane Zidane.  But Nike, unlike Adidas, really executed well on using right content for commercials and also online interactive content here, with the multiple stories for TV and ask Zlatan features online.  I didn’t notice Adida’s other content until today because I wasn’t interested enough to look before, and we’re in the group of 16.  Seems like a missed opportunity, speaking as an Adidas fan.

At least this long form shows it’s not a total flop.  I especially like the inclusion of fans and hip hop culture (an overwhelming theme in advertising this World Cup) that draws in the audience much more viscerally instead of the more putting off initial versions.  

 

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